Monday, April 26, 2010

Sliging the mud back

I'm being poked about responding to Konami and Famitsu's response regarding the Kotaku post. It's an intersting situation that we have stumbled in.

Kotaku Japan, which is not directly affiliated with Kotaku.com but does translate stories from .com, posted the infamous Famitsu article. Konami and Famitsu didn't like it. So Konami uninvited Kotaku Japan from a launch party for MGS Peace Walker.

My issue with the post made on Kotaku.com (this one so as not to confuse) is the connotation of the article. I get that it is a coincidence that both Konami and Famitsu contacted Kotaku Japan on the same day, within a short time frame, to express their displeasure with the posting of the article. And I do think that Kotaku Japan are being unfairly targeted by Konami as the original post was on Kotaku.com. At the same time, Konami is trying to protect their assets. In their situation, I'm sure many others would do the same thing. A bad rap on a MGS game could be a disaster for the company.


I understand why Mr. Ashcraft made the assertion that something fishy was going on with Konami and Famitsu. And I do feel that Famitsu should have made some notation within their review of MGS Peace Walker that it was unbiased and/or not influenced by the recent advertising with their president Hirokazu Hamamura. At the same time, I don't feel that the assertion of "these guys are bad, don't trust Famitsu!" should have been raised without evidence. Everything is circumstantial, and a bad set of circumstances at this point. To me, it seems a tad immature, I guess would be the appropriate word, the way the follow up article (this one) was presented. If anything, all sides of this situation are at fault and we need a clean slate. Start over fresh. Some things were said that probably didn't need to be said. So let's get a group hug going, make up, and move on. At this point, if you don't have the proof, don't sling the mud.


(As an aside, we should consider looking at the Famitsu system as a decade of change. The question should be, “Has Famitsu’s rating policy changed to allow for more games to reach the perfect score?” That would be a more viable debate. Thank you big bro for the reminder. :p)

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